Parks

Adopt-A-Tree Program

The MillionTreesNYC is a Parks Department affiliated program which has undertaken the ambitious task of planting one million trees in New York City.

For a newly planted tree, the first two years are critical. The level of care a tree receives during this period will largely determine its long term health and viability. You can adopt a tree near your place of residence to help keep the Murray Hill trees green and healthy!

Click the link at the left to visit the website from which the adopt-a-tree process begins: http://stewardship.nycparks.org/add_trees.php. The website has a map of trees that need to be adopted and explains how to care for the tree.

NYC Parks Department

Partnership for Parks

Reporting tree problems or requesting a new tree

Click on the link at left to:

- Report a damaged or dead tree - Request a new street tree - Notify NYC Parks of illegal tree damage - Submit a report of potentially hazardous trees or branches - Let NYC Parks know about an undesirable root, sewer, or sidewalk condition

All requests sent to NYC Parks are given direct attention and will be resolved as soon as possible.

http://www.nycgovparks.org/services/forestry/request

Tree Bed Plantings - Recommendations by the Parks Department

Planting around street trees and yard trees is recommended if done carefully. Aggressive flowers and shrubs compete with the tree for limited resources. Selected perennials (see below list) can also be complementary but, flowers that have shallow roots and die back each year (annuals) are recommended. Please do not plant flowers within 1 foot of the tree trunk. And if you do plant, be sure to provide enough water for the tree, not just enough to perk up the flowers.

Guidelines

Flowers planted around a tree

Perennials, annuals, and bulbs are beautiful additions around a tree, as long as you remember that the tree's health comes first. Choose plants that require little watering. Key words to look for are "drought tolerant" and "xeric conditions."

Use small plants and bulbs - large plants require large planting holes, which damage tree roots. In addition, plants with large root systems compete with the tree for water and nutrients.

Mulch is always good for your tree and plants. Mulch keeps the soil moist and prevents weeds from sprouting in tree pits. After planting, put mulch between the plants.

In a street tree pit, never plant bamboo, ivy, vines, woody shrubs, or evergreens. They are all major competitors for water and nutrients and can stunt or kill a tree.

Greenstreets are individually crafted by our landscape designers, and maintained by our gardeners, so please do not add extra plantings to them.

Click the link on the left for a full list of plants recommended by the Parks Department.

Displaying sites 1 thru 5 of 5 (1 Pages)
End of sites

 

Join The Murray Hill Neighborhood Association

Be involved in the preservation, beautification and improvement of this very special neighborhood, and receive discounts at some of the finest Murray Hill restaurants and merchants.


Join Today